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P-26A Peashooter

P-26A Peashooter
P-26A Peashooter
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MSRP:
$179.95
Price:
Was: $179.95
Now: $131.73
Your Savings:
$48.22 (26.8%)
SKU:
AP26T
Qty:
 
 
 
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Eligible for FREE Shipping(Eligible for FREE Shipping)
P-26A Peashooter
 
Model Description

This collectable model Boeing P-12 represents a milestone for the U.S. military – its first all-metal monoplane fighter. Painstakingly built from Philippine mahogany by our skilled craftsmen, this 1/24-scale model P-12 makes a great pilot gift or a present for any veteran, aviation enthusiast or history buff.

The P-26 Peashooter is an aircraft that represents a transition between the old and new. As the first all-metal monoplane in U.S. Service, it was clearly a sign of things to come – yet it retained an open cockpit, fixed landing gear and wire-braced wings.

The Peashooter first flew on March 20, 1932, with service deliveries beginning in late 1933. The P-26 served as a U.S. front-line fighter until 1938, when it began to be replaced by Seversky P-25s and Curtiss P-36s. However, the P-26 saw combat in the early days of World War II by Chinese and Philippine air force pilots. Two P-26s continued to serve in the Guatemalan Air Force until 1956.

The P-26 Peashooter was an agile aircraft, a favorite of pilots. With a wingspan of 28 feet, and only 23 feet long, it could reach a top speed of 234 mph. It was armed with two machine guns and up to 200 pounds of bombs. Its long tubular gun sight in front of the cockpit led to the nickname “Peashooter.”