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DC-3 American

DC-3 American
Click Image to Enlarge
MSRP:
$184.95
Price:
Was: $184.95
Now: $159.95
Your Savings:
$25.00 (13.52%)
SKU:
KDC3AAT
Qty:
 
 
 
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Eligible for FREE Shipping(Eligible for FREE Shipping)
 

 

Scale: 1/72 Mahogany model
Wing Span: 16
Length: 11
In Stock
Ship out in 2 business days!

 

 

 

 

 

The Douglas DC-3, first flew on December 17, 1935, is a fixed-wing, propeller-driven aircraft whose speed and range revolutionized air transport in the 1930s and 1940s. Many names and numbers were assigned to the DC-3. England labeled it the "Dakota" or "Dak." American pilots, during World War II, called it the “Skytrain”, "Skytrooper”, "Doug," or "Gooney Bird." The U.S. military’s official titles were C-47, C-53, C-117, and R4D. The airlines called it "The Three." Of all the names the affectionate title "Gooney Bird" lingers on. The D-13 had a lasting impact on the airline industry and World War II. It was generally regarded as one of the most significant transport aircraft ever made.

The D-3 was intended at the height of the depression and in the infancy of the Airline Industry by Douglas Aircraft Company. It carried 34 passengers in more comfort than previous airliners. D-3, a much faster, more efficient and safer airplane, was purchased by many airlines all around the world. Production was diverted during World War II to the C-47 military version and many civilian airliners were converted to the military requirements for use during the war. After the war, most of the DC-3s and C-47s were returned to civilian and commercial use and others were sold to allied air forces around the world. The DC-3 once again was carrying paid passengers and was still in service carrying passengers in the 1970s with a few airlines.

Today the DC-3s are relegated to aircraft museums, graveyards and occasionally a charter outfit still carrying cargo in them.